Tritium water dating caledonian granite radiometric dating tests

Because these concentrations are dependent on their age, the measured concentration in groundwater can indicate the time since the water fell as rain.

Tritium is produced naturally in the upper atmosphere by interaction of nitrogen, and, to a lesser extent, oxygen with cosmic rays.

If the tritium delivery as a function of time can be reconstructed, this penetration process can be used for quantitative studies of water movement through identification of the bomb peak in certain ground water bodies.

The fully automated, computer-controlled manifold system allows analysis of the full suite of noble gases (3He/4He, He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe concentrations), along with low level tritium for reporting of derived quantities that include tritium/helium-3 groundwater age, noble gas recharge temperature, and dissolved excess air concentration.

The increasing national and international demand for water has led to increasing reliance on subsurface storage, both for naturally and artificially recharged water.

This increased reliance on the groundwater in concert with the strict regulation on water quality has led to a need by water managers and regulators to understand: Characterization of mean groundwater age and recharge temperature through the use of noble gas techniques provides information that is relevant to answering these questions and that is not accessible through traditional hydrogeologic approaches.

These tests which were mainly performed in the early 1960s, led to an increase of tritium in precipitation over the continents of the northern hemisphere from roughly 5 TU to levels of the order of 1000 TU.

One TU (Tritium Unit) means a tritium to hydrogen ratio of 10.

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